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The effects of substance use on workplace injuries [publication] /

by Ramchand, Rajeev; Pomeroy, Amanda; Arkes, Jeremy.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Santa Monica : Rand corporation, 2009Description: 43 p. : ill.MeSH subject(s): Substance-Related Disorders | Workplace | Accidents, Occupational | Workplace -- legislation & jurisprudence | Accidents, Occupational -- prevention & control | ReviewAddiction suisse subject(s): Abhängigkeit | Arbeitsplatz | Unfall | PräventionPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: ReportOnline resources: Date de consultation : 10.06.2009 Summary: In this paper, we review the literature that has examined the impact of substance use on occupational injuries. We begin briefly by describing the so-called obvious associations between using on the job and occupational injuries and propose alternative reasons that substance use may be linked with work-related accidents. We then review the most-recent empirical literature that has attempted to document the relationship between substance use and occupational injuries. We highlight findings that are consistent across studies and address the limitations that most of these studies confront. We then proceed to examine the policies that attempt to address substance use in the workplace and, often without empirical analysis, hypothesize why each initiative may or may not influence rates of occupational injuries. We conclude by discussing what remains unknown about the relationship between substance use and occupational injuries and identify future avenues for research that could help fill some of these research gaps. [Introduction]
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In this paper, we review the literature that has examined the impact of substance use on occupational injuries. We begin briefly by describing the so-called obvious associations between using on the job and occupational injuries and propose alternative reasons that substance use may be linked with work-related accidents. We then review the most-recent empirical literature that has attempted to document the relationship between substance use and occupational injuries. We highlight findings that are consistent across studies and address the limitations that most of these studies confront. We then proceed to examine the policies that attempt to address substance use in the workplace and, often without empirical analysis, hypothesize why each initiative may or may not influence rates of occupational injuries. We conclude by discussing what remains unknown about the relationship between substance use and occupational injuries and identify future avenues for research that could help fill some of these research gaps. [Introduction]