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Financial burden of medical care and risk of forgoing care among Europeans with depressive symptoms [article]

by Peytremann Bridevaux, Isabelle; Chevrou-Séverac, Hélène.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleMeSH subject(s): Depression | Financing, Personal | Primary Health Care | Treatment Refusal | Depression -- economics | Financing, Personal -- statistics & numerical data | Primary Health Care -- economics | EuropeOnline resources: Date de consultation : 26.08.2008 Summary: Little is known about the financial burden of individuals with depressive symptoms. This study explored that burden, using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe. To assess the association between depressive symptoms and the individuals' financial burden for medical care and whether they forwent medical care because of costs, logistic regressions were performed that adjusted for age, gender, marital status, education, and chronic diseases. A total of 16,696 noninstitutionalized individuals aged 50-79 years were included in the study. Individuals with depressive symptoms and those without such symptoms bore a similar financial burden. However, individuals with depressive symptoms were at increased risk of forgoing care because of costs, which may worsen their health and financial situation. [Authors]
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
IST, Institut universitaire romand de santé au travail; Bibliothèque
PUB-ART-EDITO (Browse shelf) Available

Little is known about the financial burden of individuals with depressive symptoms. This study explored that burden, using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe. To assess the association between depressive symptoms and the individuals' financial burden for medical care and whether they forwent medical care because of costs, logistic regressions were performed that adjusted for age, gender, marital status, education, and chronic diseases. A total of 16,696 noninstitutionalized individuals aged 50-79 years were included in the study. Individuals with depressive symptoms and those without such symptoms bore a similar financial burden. However, individuals with depressive symptoms were at increased risk of forgoing care because of costs, which may worsen their health and financial situation. [Authors]