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Impact of parental education and income inequality on children's food intake [article]

by Sausenthaler, Stefanie; Kompauer, Iris; Mielck, Andreas; Borte, Michael; Herbarth, Olf; Schaaf, Beate; Von Berg, Andrea; Heinrich, J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSAPHIR theme(s): Nutrition - Comportements alimentairesMeSH subject(s): Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena | Parents | Poverty | Socioeconomic Factors | Diet -- standards | Parents -- education | Parents -- psychologyOnline resources: Date de consultation : 22.05.2007 Summary: OBJECTIVE: To analyse the association between socio-economic indicatorsand diet among 2-year-old children, by assessing the independentcontribution of parental education and equivalent income to food intake.DESIGN: The analysis was based on data from a prospective birth cohortstudy. Information on diet was obtained using a semi-quantitativefood-frequency questionnaire. Low and high intake of food was definedaccording to the lowest and the highest quintile of food consumptionfrequency, respectively. SETTING: Four German cities (Munich, Leipzig,Wesel, Bad Honnef), 1999-2001.Subjects Subjects were 2637 children at theage of 2 years, whose parents completed questionnaires gatheringinformation on lifestyle factors, including parental socio-economicstatus, household consumption frequencies and children's diet. RESULTS:Both low parental education and low equivalent income were associated witha low intake of fresh fruit, cooked vegetables and olive oil, and a highintake of canned vegetables or fruit, margarine, mayonnaise and processedsalad dressing in children. Children with a low intake of milk and cream,and a high intake of hardened vegetable fat, more likely had parents withlower education. Low butter intake was associated with low equivalentincome only. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may be helpful for futureintervention programmes with more targeted policies aiming at animprovement of children's diets.
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OBJECTIVE: To analyse the association between socio-economic indicatorsand diet among 2-year-old children, by assessing the independentcontribution of parental education and equivalent income to food intake.DESIGN: The analysis was based on data from a prospective birth cohortstudy. Information on diet was obtained using a semi-quantitativefood-frequency questionnaire. Low and high intake of food was definedaccording to the lowest and the highest quintile of food consumptionfrequency, respectively. SETTING: Four German cities (Munich, Leipzig,Wesel, Bad Honnef), 1999-2001.Subjects Subjects were 2637 children at theage of 2 years, whose parents completed questionnaires gatheringinformation on lifestyle factors, including parental socio-economicstatus, household consumption frequencies and children's diet. RESULTS:Both low parental education and low equivalent income were associated witha low intake of fresh fruit, cooked vegetables and olive oil, and a highintake of canned vegetables or fruit, margarine, mayonnaise and processedsalad dressing in children. Children with a low intake of milk and cream,and a high intake of hardened vegetable fat, more likely had parents withlower education. Low butter intake was associated with low equivalentincome only. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may be helpful for futureintervention programmes with more targeted policies aiming at animprovement of children's diets.