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Your money or your life : [publication] : strong medicine for America's health care system /

by Cutler, David M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2004Description: XIV, 158 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0195160428.MeSH subject(s): Health Planning | Health Care Reform | Health Behavior | Social Medicine | Health Planning -- economics | Health Care Reform -- economics | United StatesPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: MonographSummary: The problems of medical care confront us daily: a bureaucracy that makes a trip to the doctor worse than a trip to the dentist, doctors who can't practice medicine the way they choose, more than 40 million people without health insurance in the United States […].Barely one in five Americans thinks the medical system works well. The author of this book is a Harvard economist who served on President Clinton's healthcare task force. […]. He argues here that health care has in fact improved exponentially over the last fifty years, and that the successes of the American system suggest ways in which we might improve care, make the system easier to deal with, and extend coverage to all Americans. The author applies an economic analysis to show that America's spending on medicine is well worth it--and that the country could do even better by spending more. Further, millions of people with easily manageable diseases, from hypertension to depression to diabetes, receive either too much or too little care because of inefficiencies in the way the system reimburse care, resulting in poor health and in some cases premature death. The key to improving the system, Cutler argues, is to change the way they organize health care. Everyone must be insured for the medical system to perform well, and payments should be based on the quality of services provided not just on the amount of cutting and poking performed. [US Editor]
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The problems of medical care confront us daily: a bureaucracy that makes a trip to the doctor worse than a trip to the dentist, doctors who can't practice medicine the way they choose, more than 40 million people without health insurance in the United States […].Barely one in five Americans thinks the medical system works well. The author of this book is a Harvard economist who served on President Clinton's healthcare task force. […]. He argues here that health care has in fact improved exponentially over the last fifty years, and that the successes of the American system suggest ways in which we might improve care, make the system easier to deal with, and extend coverage to all Americans. The author applies an economic analysis to show that America's spending on medicine is well worth it--and that the country could do even better by spending more. Further, millions of people with easily manageable diseases, from hypertension to depression to diabetes, receive either too much or too little care because of inefficiencies in the way the system reimburse care, resulting in poor health and in some cases premature death. The key to improving the system, Cutler argues, is to change the way they organize health care. Everyone must be insured for the medical system to perform well, and payments should be based on the quality of services provided not just on the amount of cutting and poking performed. [US Editor]