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Americans at risk : [publication] : why we are not prepared for megadisasters and what we can do now /

by Redlener, Irwin.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : A.A. Knopf, 2006, cop. 2006Description: XXVII, 273 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0307265269.SAPHIR theme(s): Violences - MaltraitanceMeSH subject(s): Disasters | Disaster Planning | Rescue Work | Emergency Medicine | Terrorism | Bioterrorism | Disasters -- prevention & control | Disaster Planning -- organization & administration | Disaster Planning -- standards | Rescue Work -- organization & administration | Emergency Medicine -- organization & administration | Bioterrorism -- prevention & control | United StatesPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: MonographSummary: Five years after 9/11 and one year after Hurricane Katrina, it is painfully clear that the government's emergency response capacity is plagued by incompetence and a paralyzing bureaucracy. The author, who founded and directs the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, brings his years of experience with disasters and health care crises, national and international, to an incisive analysis of why our health care system, our infrastructure, and our overall approach to disaster readiness have left the nation vulnerable, virtually unable to respond effectively to catastrophic events.[…] ,he also analyzes the role of nongovernmental organizations, such as the American Red Cross in the aftermath of Katrina.[…] As a doctor, the author is especially concerned about America's increasingly dysfunctional and expensive health care system, incapable of handling a large-scale public health emergency, such as pandemic flu or widespread bioterrorism. And he also looks at the serious problem of a disengaged, uninformed citizenry-one of the most important obstacles to assuring optimal readiness for any major crisis. […] He describes five natural and man-made disaster scenarios as a way to imagine what we might face, what our current systems would and would not prepare us for, and what would constitute optimal planning-for government and the public-in each situation. To see what could be learned from others, he points up some of the more effective ways countries in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East have dealt with various disasters. And he concludes with a real prescription: a nine-point proposal for how America can be better prepared as well as an addendum of what citizens themselves can do [Ed.]
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Five years after 9/11 and one year after Hurricane Katrina, it is painfully clear that the government's emergency response capacity is plagued by incompetence and a paralyzing bureaucracy. The author, who founded and directs the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, brings his years of experience with disasters and health care crises, national and international, to an incisive analysis of why our health care system, our infrastructure, and our overall approach to disaster readiness have left the nation vulnerable, virtually unable to respond effectively to catastrophic events.[…] ,he also analyzes the role of nongovernmental organizations, such as the American Red Cross in the aftermath of Katrina.[…] As a doctor, the author is especially concerned about America's increasingly dysfunctional and expensive health care system, incapable of handling a large-scale public health emergency, such as pandemic flu or widespread bioterrorism. And he also looks at the serious problem of a disengaged, uninformed citizenry-one of the most important obstacles to assuring optimal readiness for any major crisis. […] He describes five natural and man-made disaster scenarios as a way to imagine what we might face, what our current systems would and would not prepare us for, and what would constitute optimal planning-for government and the public-in each situation. To see what could be learned from others, he points up some of the more effective ways countries in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East have dealt with various disasters. And he concludes with a real prescription: a nine-point proposal for how America can be better prepared as well as an addendum of what citizens themselves can do [Ed.]