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Terrorism : biological, chemical, and nuclear /

by Upfal, Mark J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Clinics in Occupational and Environmental Medicine: 2002,2,2Publisher: Philadelphia ; London : W.B. Saunders, cop. 2003Description: XXI, p. 169-473 : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0721603718.MeSH subject(s): Terrorism | Bioterrorism | Biological Warfare | Chemical Warfare | Nuclear Warfare | Journal Issue -- saphirPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: Journal Issue
Contents:
Terrorism and the civilian response. - Role of the occupational and environmental medicine physician. - Weapons of mass destruction: biologic agents. - Smallpox: brief review and update. - Lessons from the anthrax attacks of 2001: the New Jersey experience. - Water and food contamination. - Weapons of mass destruction: chemical agents. - Weapons of mass destruction: vesicants. - Halogen gases, ammonia, and phosgene. - Pharmacotherapy for the toxicity of hazardous materials. - Fate of chemical release into the environment. - Weapons of mass destruction: nuclear agents. - Explosive and antipersonnel agents. - Psychologic responses to bioterrorist attacks. - Communicating the risk for bioterrorism. - Corporate response to terrorism. - Hospital and emergency department preparedness for biologic, chemical, and nuclear terrorism. - Managing infectious risks to first responders. - Communications for crisis coordination in the medical setting
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
Consultable sur place IST, Institut universitaire romand de santé au travail; Bibliothèque
Bibliothèque
IST MA-769 (Browse shelf) Available

Bibliography

Terrorism and the civilian response. - Role of the occupational and environmental medicine physician. - Weapons of mass destruction: biologic agents. - Smallpox: brief review and update. - Lessons from the anthrax attacks of 2001: the New Jersey experience. - Water and food contamination. - Weapons of mass destruction: chemical agents. - Weapons of mass destruction: vesicants. - Halogen gases, ammonia, and phosgene. - Pharmacotherapy for the toxicity of hazardous materials. - Fate of chemical release into the environment. - Weapons of mass destruction: nuclear agents. - Explosive and antipersonnel agents. - Psychologic responses to bioterrorist attacks. - Communicating the risk for bioterrorism. - Corporate response to terrorism. - Hospital and emergency department preparedness for biologic, chemical, and nuclear terrorism. - Managing infectious risks to first responders. - Communications for crisis coordination in the medical setting