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Creating more effective graphs [publication] /

by Robbins, Naomi B.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Hoboken, NJ : Wiley, 2005, 2010Description: XVIII, 402 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780471274025; 047127402X.MeSH subject(s): Statistiques | GraphiquesAddiction suisse subject(s): Statistik | Graphik | MethodePUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: MonographSummary: [Table of contents] : 1. Introduction. - 1.1 What we mean by an efficient graph. - 1.2 General comments - 1.2.1 Captions - 1.2.2 The data we plot 2. Limitations of some common charts and graphs - 2.1 Pie charts - 2.2 Charts with 3-D efect - 2.3 Bar charts : stacked and grouped - 2.4 Difference between curves - 2.5 Bubbled plot 3. Human perception and our ability to decode graphs - 3.1 Elementary graphical perception tasks - 3.2 Ordered elementary tasks - 3.3 Role of distance and detection 4. Some more effective graphs in one or two dimensions - 4.1 Distribution of one variable - 4.1.1 Strip plots - 4.1.2 Dot plots - 4.1.3 Histograms - 4.1.4 Jittering - 4.2 Comparing distributions: boxplots - 4.3 Relationship of two variables: scatterplots - 4.4 Time series - 4.5 Line graphs 5. Trellis Display and Other Ways to Display More than Two Variables - 5.1 Alternative presentations of three variables - 5.1.1 Stacked bar chart - 5.1.2 Labeled scatterplot - 5.1.3 Trellis display - 5.2 More than three variables - 5.2.1 Superposed data sets - 5.2.2 Trellis multipanel displays - 5.2.3 Scatterplot matrices - 5.2.4 Mosaic plots - 5.2.5 Linked micromaps - 5.2.6 Parallel coordinate plots - 5.2.7 Nightingale Rose - 5.2.8 Financial plot 6. General principles for creating effective graphs - 6.1 Terminology - 6.2 Visual Clarity - 6.2.1 Clarity of data - 6.2.2 Clarity of other elements - 6.3 Clear understanding - 6.4 General strategy 7. Scales - 7.1 Aspect ratio - 7.2 Must zero be included? - 7.3 When to use logarithmic scales - 7.4 Scale breaks - 7.5 Using two Y scales - 7.6 Data hidden in the scales - 7.7 Other principles involving scales 8. Applying what we've learned : before and after examples - 8.1 Grouped bar chart - 8.2 Ten small graphs - 8.3 Radar chart - 8.4 Multiple pie charts - 8.5 Tables 9. Some comments on software - 9.1 Statistical software: the S language - 9.2 Drawing programs : illustrator - 9.3 Spreadsheets: excel - 9.3.1 Moving an axis in excel - 9.3.2 Line charts with uneven time intervals - 9.3.3 Dot chart from excel - 9.3.4 Data labels in excel 10. Questions and answers - 1. When should I use a table and when should I use a graph? - 2. Should I use different graphs for presentations and for written reports - 3. How do graphs for data analysis and graphs for communication differ? - 4. What should I use instead of pie charts? - 5. What if I just want an impression of the direction of the data? Then may I use 3-D charts? - 6. I use 3-D charts but I included data labels. That's OK, isn't it? - 7. I Want my Graphs to Attract the reader's attention. How should I decorate Them? - 8. Why do you think we see so many bad graphs? - 9. When should I use each kind of graphs? Appendix A: Checklist of Possible Graph Defects. Appendix B: List of Figures with Sources. References. Index.

[Table of contents] : 1. Introduction. - 1.1 What we mean by an efficient graph. - 1.2 General comments - 1.2.1 Captions - 1.2.2 The data we plot 2. Limitations of some common charts and graphs - 2.1 Pie charts - 2.2 Charts with 3-D efect - 2.3 Bar charts : stacked and grouped - 2.4 Difference between curves - 2.5 Bubbled plot 3. Human perception and our ability to decode graphs - 3.1 Elementary graphical perception tasks - 3.2 Ordered elementary tasks - 3.3 Role of distance and detection 4. Some more effective graphs in one or two dimensions - 4.1 Distribution of one variable - 4.1.1 Strip plots - 4.1.2 Dot plots - 4.1.3 Histograms - 4.1.4 Jittering - 4.2 Comparing distributions: boxplots - 4.3 Relationship of two variables: scatterplots - 4.4 Time series - 4.5 Line graphs 5. Trellis Display and Other Ways to Display More than Two Variables - 5.1 Alternative presentations of three variables - 5.1.1 Stacked bar chart - 5.1.2 Labeled scatterplot - 5.1.3 Trellis display - 5.2 More than three variables - 5.2.1 Superposed data sets - 5.2.2 Trellis multipanel displays - 5.2.3 Scatterplot matrices - 5.2.4 Mosaic plots - 5.2.5 Linked micromaps - 5.2.6 Parallel coordinate plots - 5.2.7 Nightingale Rose - 5.2.8 Financial plot 6. General principles for creating effective graphs - 6.1 Terminology - 6.2 Visual Clarity - 6.2.1 Clarity of data - 6.2.2 Clarity of other elements - 6.3 Clear understanding - 6.4 General strategy 7. Scales - 7.1 Aspect ratio - 7.2 Must zero be included? - 7.3 When to use logarithmic scales - 7.4 Scale breaks - 7.5 Using two Y scales - 7.6 Data hidden in the scales - 7.7 Other principles involving scales 8. Applying what we've learned : before and after examples - 8.1 Grouped bar chart - 8.2 Ten small graphs - 8.3 Radar chart - 8.4 Multiple pie charts - 8.5 Tables 9. Some comments on software - 9.1 Statistical software: the S language - 9.2 Drawing programs : illustrator - 9.3 Spreadsheets: excel - 9.3.1 Moving an axis in excel - 9.3.2 Line charts with uneven time intervals - 9.3.3 Dot chart from excel - 9.3.4 Data labels in excel 10. Questions and answers - 1. When should I use a table and when should I use a graph? - 2. Should I use different graphs for presentations and for written reports - 3. How do graphs for data analysis and graphs for communication differ? - 4. What should I use instead of pie charts? - 5. What if I just want an impression of the direction of the data? Then may I use 3-D charts? - 6. I use 3-D charts but I included data labels. That's OK, isn't it? - 7. I Want my Graphs to Attract the reader's attention. How should I decorate Them? - 8. Why do you think we see so many bad graphs? - 9. When should I use each kind of graphs? Appendix A: Checklist of Possible Graph Defects. Appendix B: List of Figures with Sources. References. Index.