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Drug testing at school and in the workplace [publication] /

by Conseil de l'Europe. Groupe de coopération en matière de lutte contre l'abus et le trafic illicite des stupéfiants. Comité sur les questions éthiques et déontologiques.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [Strasbourg] : Pompidou Group, 2008Description: 114 p.MeSH subject(s): Substance Abuse Detection | Schools | Workplace | Ethics | EuropeAddiction suisse subject(s): Test | Drogen | Schule | Arbeitsplatz | EthikPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: ReportOnline resources: Date de consultation : 02.02.2010 Summary: [Experts' conclusion] : In the opinion of the platform on ethical issues and professional standards, drug testing is acceptable only if it is carried out by health professionals bound by confidentiality equirements who wish to refine their diagnosis or if it is performed in response to a request from a law enforcement or judicial body, in the precise framework of what is authorised by law. It should be borne in mind, however, that the result of these tests require confirmation. All other testing procedures in schools or the workplace pose an ethical problem founded on international, universal and absolute rights. It would be appropriate to take steps to prohibit such procedures, and to seek to achieve the same ends by means that show greater respect for privacy, family life and the fundamental rights of every individual and are more appropriate for such purposes, in particular for preventing young people from developing drug addiction and adults in high-risk jobs from causing accidents
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due
Addiction Suisse; Bibliothèque
GL-1055 (Browse shelf) Available

[Experts' conclusion] : In the opinion of the platform on ethical issues and professional standards, drug testing is acceptable only if it is carried out by health professionals bound by confidentiality equirements who wish to refine their diagnosis or if it is performed in response to a request from a law enforcement or judicial body, in the precise framework of what is authorised by law. It should be borne in mind, however, that the result of these tests require confirmation. All other testing procedures in schools or the workplace pose an ethical problem founded on international, universal and absolute rights. It would be appropriate to take steps to prohibit such procedures, and to seek to achieve the same ends by means that show greater respect for privacy, family life and the fundamental rights of every individual and are more appropriate for such purposes, in particular for preventing young people from developing drug addiction and adults in high-risk jobs from causing accidents