Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Worker protection : private sector ergonomics programs yield positive results : report to Congressional requesters /

by Joyner, Carlotta C; United States. General Accounting Office.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [Washington, DC] : U.S. General Accounting Office, [1997]Description: 137 f. : ill. ; 32 cm.MeSH subject(s): Human Engineering | Program Evaluation | United States | Monograph | ReviewPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: MonographSummary: To identify the core elements of effective ergonomics programs, a literature review was conducted and experts in the business labor and academic communities interviewed. Case studies were conducted at selected facilites of five employers, interviewing pertinent program officials and obtaining program and results data. Pertinent officials were also interviewed and information about current activities from OSHA and selected states that operate their own OSHA programs obtained. Effective ergonomic programs must have the following core set of elements to ensure that ergonomic hazards are identified and controlled to protect workers: management commitment, employee involvement, identification of problem jobs, development of solutions (that is, controls) for problem jobs, training and education for employees and appropriate medical management. The work revealed that positive results can be achieved through an approach incorporating these core elements that are implemented in a simple, informal, site-specific manner
Item type Current location Call number Status Notes Date due
Empruntable IST, Institut universitaire romand de santé au travail; Bibliothèque
Bibliothèque
IST WA-430-USA-Wor-1997 (Browse shelf) Available No d'inventaire : 125/98

GAO/HEHS-97-163

vdist-/05.2013 To identify the core elements of effective ergonomics programs, a literature review was conducted and experts in the business labor and academic communities interviewed. Case studies were conducted at selected facilites of five employers, interviewing pertinent program officials and obtaining program and results data. Pertinent officials were also interviewed and information about current activities from OSHA and selected states that operate their own OSHA programs obtained. Effective ergonomic programs must have the following core set of elements to ensure that ergonomic hazards are identified and controlled to protect workers: management commitment, employee involvement, identification of problem jobs, development of solutions (that is, controls) for problem jobs, training and education for employees and appropriate medical management. The work revealed that positive results can be achieved through an approach incorporating these core elements that are implemented in a simple, informal, site-specific manner