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Hospital car parking : [publication] : the impact of access costs /

by Mason, Anne.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: CHE Research paper.Publisher: York : University of York, Centre for Health Economics, 2010Description: 65 p. : ill.SAPHIR theme(s): Économie de la santé | Hôpitaux - Etablissements de soins et d'accueilMeSH subject(s): Parking Facilities | Hospitals | Visitors to Patients | Health Services Accessibility | Parking Facilities -- economics | Health Services Accessibility -- economics | Great Britain | ReviewPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: MonographOnline resources: Date de consultation : 14.06.2012 Summary: Background: NHS Trusts have statutory powers to raise income, which allow them to decide whether to charge, and how much to charge, for hospital car parking. Trusts are not obliged to provide parking facilities on their premises, but provision will inevitably incur costs in the form of maintenance, security and staffing. If Trusts choose not to charge for parking, then these costs must be covered from other sources of revenue, potentially diverting resources from patient care. Charges typically account for around 0.25% of a hospital.s income, but can be as high as 1%. The government offers financial support to people on low incomes who incur travel expenses when accessing health care. Objectives and methods: Two rapid literature reviews were undertaken inform government policy on hospital car parking charges. The first review (Part 1) included studies that quantified access costs and / or considered their impact on patients and on visitors. The second review (Part 2) considered access costs more broadly in terms of travel time or distance, and focused on UK evidence on the impact of these costs on the utilisation of secondary care services. [Authors]
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Background: NHS Trusts have statutory powers to raise income, which allow them to decide whether to charge, and how much to charge, for hospital car parking. Trusts are not obliged to provide parking facilities on their premises, but provision will inevitably incur costs in the form of maintenance, security and staffing. If Trusts choose not to charge for parking, then these costs must be covered from other sources of revenue, potentially diverting resources from patient care. Charges typically account for around 0.25% of a hospital.s income, but can be as high as 1%. The government offers financial support to people on low incomes who incur travel expenses when accessing health care. Objectives and methods: Two rapid literature reviews were undertaken inform government policy on hospital car parking charges. The first review (Part 1) included studies that quantified access costs and / or considered their impact on patients and on visitors. The second review (Part 2) considered access costs more broadly in terms of travel time or distance, and focused on UK evidence on the impact of these costs on the utilisation of secondary care services. [Authors]