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Medicine and social justice : [publication] : essays on the distribution of health care /

by Rhodes, Rosamond [edt]; Battin, Margaret P [edt]; Silvers, Anita [edt].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Oxford [etc.] : Oxford University Press, 2002Description: XVII, 469 p. ; 26 cm.ISBN: 019514354X.MeSH subject(s): Health Services Accessibility | Delivery of Health Care | Social Justice | Ethics, Medical | Economics, Medical | Health Priorities | Health Care Rationing | Human Rights | Delivery of Health Care -- ethicsPUBLICATION TYPE SAPHIR: MonographSummary: Because medicine can preserve and restore health and function, it is widely acknowledged as a basic good that a just society owes its members. Yet there is controversy over the scope of what should be provided, to whom, how, when and why. This comprehensive and authoritative book lays a theoretical foundation for understanding the debate, assesses how health care is distributed in different countries and to various social groups, and analyses practical issues in constructing a socially just health care system. The four sections are "Theoretical foundations," "Rationing and access in today's world," "Special needs of social groups," and "Dilemmas for medicine and health-care systems: assessment and priorities." Among the issues addressed are how limited resources ought be allocated in a context of increasing costs and needs; whether it can ever be appropriate to hold people responsible for the voluntary role they have played in creating their own health problems; how factors such as gender, race, age, disability, and economic status do or should affect health care; and how phenomena such as compassion shape our health care priorities.
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Because medicine can preserve and restore health and function, it is widely acknowledged as a basic good that a just society owes its members. Yet there is controversy over the scope of what should be provided, to whom, how, when and why. This comprehensive and authoritative book lays a theoretical foundation for understanding the debate, assesses how health care is distributed in different countries and to various social groups, and analyses practical issues in constructing a socially just health care system. The four sections are "Theoretical foundations," "Rationing and access in today's world," "Special needs of social groups," and "Dilemmas for medicine and health-care systems: assessment and priorities." Among the issues addressed are how limited resources ought be allocated in a context of increasing costs and needs; whether it can ever be appropriate to hold people responsible for the voluntary role they have played in creating their own health problems; how factors such as gender, race, age, disability, and economic status do or should affect health care; and how phenomena such as compassion shape our health care priorities.